Poor Elvis

A new-to-me acronym for the treble clef lines – from one of my students who heard it from her school music teacher:

Elvis’s Guitar Broke Down Friday.

I see Anne Crosby has a great new graphic for Bass Clef lines – and my own students got hooked on oddquartet’s Bass Clef lines last year.

Who’s going to design a cool graphic to go with this one?

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About LaDona's Music Studio

Musician, pianist, teacher, blogger.
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2 Responses to Poor Elvis

  1. Rami Bar-Niv says:

    LaDona,
    The problem with Anne Crosby’s graphic for Bass Clef lines is also the reason for students having difficulties with reading bass clef. First of all, it should always be introduced and seen as part of the entire grand piano staff. Secondly the lines and spaces of the bass clef should be counted from top to bottom. All lines and spaces of the grand piano staff should be counted from the center outwards. Only this way one can see and show all the similarities and mirrored reflections of the system. e.g. C, one octave above middle C, and C, one octave below middle C are both in the 3rd space. Best wishes, Rami http://pianofingering.tripod.com/
    http://ramisrhapsody.tripod.com/
    http://www.youtube.com/user/barniv

    • Rami, I’ve tried all possible methods/acronyms/whatevers of teaching note-reading. Honestly, I have found there’s no one method that works for all students. Some need the cute factor of these acronyms – and if a graphic will help – all the better. With some, the centre-outward approach works wonders. It doesn’t with others. Having said that, I do usually use grand staff flashcards for students. Thank you for commenting – I appreciate your input.

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