Monthly Archives: March 2011

Quote of the Week

In light of yesterday’s post, this seems appropriate: The wise musicians are those who play what they can master. ~Duke Ellington

Posted in Quotes | Leave a comment

Is Grade 1 harder than it used to be?

I’ve been teaching for about 30 years (counting the years I was a student myself) and it seems to me that traditional wisdom held that after 2 years of study a student was ready for grade 1.  This is not … Continue reading

Posted in General, Piano pedagogy | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Peace Country by Christine Donkin

The Peace Country is the area in northwest Alberta and northeast British Columbia through which the Peace River flows. It is where Christine Donkin grew up, although she currently lives in Ottawa. In her words, “the music in this collection … Continue reading

Posted in Canadiana, Music Reviews | 1 Comment

Am I Too Loud?

This is the question commonly asked by accompanists and the title of Gerald Moore’s memoirs – the English composer who did more than anyone else to elevate the status of the accompanist, now known as a collaborative pianist. I first … Continue reading

Posted in Books about Music, Performance, Technic | Tagged , | Leave a comment

How do you draw a Treble Clef?

The best way ever to teach a student to draw a treble clef can be found at http://pianodiscoveries.ca/. Anne Crosby Gaudet has created several you-tube videos and a corresponding workbook to teach notation. “Gina” takes the student through the steps to … Continue reading

Posted in Canadiana, Music Reviews, Piano pedagogy, Theory | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Quote of the Week

“The study of the history of music and the hearing of masterworks of different epochs will quickly cure you of vanity and self-adoration.” ~Robert Schumann

Posted in Inspirational, Quotes | Leave a comment

From Prairie to Pine

From Praire to Pine is a collection of Piano Solos by Saskatchewan composers, published by the Saskatchewan Registered Music Teachers’ Association for the Saskatchewan Centennial in 2005. The collection includes 25 pieces by 15 composers. Some are familiar names to … Continue reading

Posted in Canadiana, Music Reviews, Performance, Technic | Tagged | Leave a comment

Learning to Listen: Elementary Class

Because of scheduling issues, this ended up being a large class. I had 8 students ranging from age 7-10, most in their 3rd or 4th year of lessons, but with 2 who were first-years. This was the class I was … Continue reading

Posted in Piano pedagogy, Studio News | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Learning to Listen: Advanced Class

My Advanced Class had 6 teen-age girls and an adult who couldn’t make it to the Monday class. Most are playing at an advanced level. I did find this week that grouping them by age worked better than by level. … Continue reading

Posted in Piano pedagogy, Studio News | Tagged , | 2 Comments

It starts in kindergarten

I would advise my young colleagues, the composers of symphonies, to drop in sometimes at the kindergarten, too. It is there that it is decided whether there will be anybody to understand their works in twenty years’ time. ~Zoltan Kodaly … Continue reading

Posted in General, Quotes | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Learning to Listen: Late Elementary Class

The “Late Elementary Class” consisted of five students, aged 9-12, ranging  from an older beginner to grade 3. I read recently (not sure where) that grouping students by age, rather than level, is more successful. For this reason, as well … Continue reading

Posted in General, Piano pedagogy, Studio News | Leave a comment

Learning to Listen: Beginner Class

This is Performance Class Week. Last night I had the Beginner Class – 6 students age 7-8, all first- or second-year students. These are fun kids. I dragged my 19-year-old son, Mark, into the studio and had him assist me … Continue reading

Posted in Piano pedagogy, Studio News | Tagged | Leave a comment